Audiobooks For Dyslexia

 

Student listening to an audiobook

Free public domain audiobook sites for dyslexic students: 

While there are a number of free audiobook options on the website, I will focus my discussion on my two favorites for dyslexic students.  Please note that many local libraries will also offer audiobook options.  You can often "check out" audiobooks via an internet portal.  

  • Librivox - Free - This site offers free text to speech audio books for public domain books. Volunteers read, record chapters of books, and release the audio files back onto the internet.
  • Project Gutenberg  - Free - This site also presents free text to speech audio books for public domain literature. Volunteers record chapters of books and release the audio files back onto the internet.

Audiobooks for students with reading disabilities - membership sites:

This option is available for dyslexic students or others with a reading or print based disabilities.  For these sites, membership does require a qualified, certifying professional to fill out a form from the site.  This professional can be a special education teacher, a vocational rehabilitation counselor, ophthalmologist, psychologist, doctor, or neuropsychologist.  After a parent or guardian fills out an application, they will need to email the appropriate forms to a professional that can verify the needed documentation for membership.  Please note that the only free option below is Bookshare, as it received financial support from the government.
    • Bookshare - Free - This site offers free text to speech audio books for diagnosed individuals with dyslexia.  The books are simply scanned. Then, free or purchasable apps use computerized or synthesized voices to read the text aloud.  See my assistive technology page for app options.  
    • Learning Ally - $ - This affordable option offers text to speech audio books for diagnosed individuals with dyslexia.  Learning Ally uses volunteers to read the books aloud.
    • AnyBook Personal Reader - $ - This unique product allows physical books to be read aloud without having to scan the text.  Pages are orally read and digitally recorded. Readers can then instantly access any page via scannable stickers. 

    Purchasable audiobooks for students with dyslexia:

    Again, there are more alternatives available on the internet, but the following two audiobook options are my personal favorites. 
    • Audible.com - $ - This Amazon company provides audiobooks.  It also provides magazines, radio shows, podcasts, stand‐up comedy, and speeches. They claim to feature the best narrators interpreting books by top authors.  
    • Raz-Kids - $ - This website provides comprehensive reading resources for students, with hundreds of audiobooks offered at 27 different levels of difficulty. Kids access leveled text and read at their own rate.  They can record themselves reading, and they can even take an eQuiz.

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